Blacklist a domain in Office365

If you are using Office365 the spam filter usually does a good job. However, there will always be people that find a way around it to bombard your inbox with nonsense you never signed up for. If you want to tackle those people head on, you can start by blacklisting their domain. In this guide, I am quickly explaining how you can do just that: blacklisting a domain (and all mails ) in Office365.

I am of course assuming that you have access to the Office365 Admin Center

Continue reading Blacklist a domain in Office365

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Review: Akeeba LoginGuard

We have taken a sneak peek at Akeeba LoginGuard for you, and made it into a video.

Akeeba LoginGuard is a Joomla add-on that will give your website new two-factor authentication tools. The tools lift the security of your website to the next level. Akeeba LoginGuard offers quite a few benefits over the already existing options in Joomla

More authentication options

Where Joomla offers ‘only’ OTP (one-time passwords) and Yubikey out of the box, LoginGuard takes things further. Which is a positive thing. While the options in Joomla are a good start, and Yubikeys are a great little things to use, it’s always good to have other options, especially in corporate settings.

LoginGuard offers the following options:

  • OTP (via an authenticator app)
  • Yubikey
  • Codes via e-mail
  • Codes via SMS (using SMSAPI.com)
  • Push notification (using PushBullet)
  • Fixed code(s)

Configure 2FA for users

Akeeba LoginGuard also allows you to setup 2FA options for your users. We discuss the upside of this feature and other features in our video review.

 

Configure U2F in Joomla and WordPress [VIDEOS]

User accounts. Without them, the back-end of your WordPress or Joomla site would be a barren wasteland. And, well, there would be no point in having a back-end.

However, with user accounts comes great responsibility not to get them hacked, as anyone with enough credentials can turn your website in a pile of spam for enhancement pills, Eastern offers and other unpleasantries.

Two-factor authentication is all the rage right now. I wouldn’t say it’s mainstream, per sé as many users still think that their “kittykat01” password will protect them from evil. But it’s now available on pretty much every big site. It comes in a lot of forms and shapes. Mostly in the form of OTP (and Android Authenticator.)

U2F is one of those “universal” two-factor solutions. It’s backed (and implemented) by Google, Github and quite a few others. It’s also pretty easy to use. And, as of now, you can setup U2F in both Joomla and WordPress.

Now, I know we usually spell things out for you. However, we decided to switch things up a bit. We made two videos in cooperation with Ciptor Benelux, a small but fierce startup with a focus on authentication that’s hoping to take the Benelux (and then the world?!) by storm.

The videos should give you a good idea on how to setup U2F. The WordPress video is about five minutes long. The Joomla video is a bit longer, because we dove into Akeeba LoginGuard as well. It’s part “How to”, part “This component is pretty cool.

How to setup U2F in WordPress

How to setup U2F in Joomla (Using Akeeba LoginGuard)

Automattic brings free themes to Jetpack, WordPress Premium

Automattic, the company behind WordPress.com, WooCommerce, Jetpack and others has been betting hard on services lately. To add more value to users of their existing services, they’re now bringing a big seelction of themes to them, for free.

Jetpack brings a little more .com to your blog

Automattics’ plugin WordPress tries to bring WordPress.com features to your blog. Options like social sharing, simple forms, sitemaps and others are a few clicks away if you install Jetpack and connect your website to WordPress.com. And now, Jetpack users get another “WordPress.com” perk: access to the WordPress.com themes. Users of Jetpack can now install templates that were previously made available to WordPress.com users, which comes down to 150+ free themes that can be installed within a few clicks. There’s some pretty interesting templates in there. They might not all be “commercially” interesting for business sites but a lot of them definitely have their uses.

WordPress Premium now includes… Premium Themes

WordPress Premium is a service that adds new features to your WordPress.com blog, like a custom domain name, more storage, more design options and VideoPress. As of this month, a new option has been added.

Premium users now have access to all “Premium Themes.” These are WordPress.com themes that you could unlock by purchasing them (for an average price of €80). Now, you can use these themes for free when you’re a WordPress Premium user. Which is is a great deal, considering a Premium plan costs you €99 a year. You do the math.

Error decoding JSON data: Syntax error – One Possible Fix

All right, all right. We’re mighty late with a ‘fix’ for this problem. But that’s because we haven’t run into it either. Let’s get to it.

After upgrading Joomla to Joomla 3.6.3 you might see the following error when trying to edit an article (and possibly modules, …):

Error decoding JSON data: Syntax error

I am not going to pretend to speak developer all of a sudden, but this error means that something’s wrong with one of the ‘settings’ for your article / module. Somewhere in your database, a mistake was made.

One “popular” fix back in the days was to partially roll back to Joomla 3.6.2. That’s the wrong approach for two reasons:

  1. THAT VERSION WAS PATCHED FOR A REASON.
  2. You’re not fixing the problem. You’re just killing the messenger and burying the body.

Instead, you could look into the database itself. When I read from Michael Babker (I hope I wrote that right) that it could be as simple as a { too little in one of the ‘settings’ fields I went to research.

So, here’s what you can do to try and solve the problem.

  1. Note the ID of the article / module
  2. Open PHPMyAdmin / your MySQL workbench of your choice.
  3. Lookup the item in com_content, com_modules or com_whateveryourelooking for. Joomla is fairly good at naming databases after what they contain. (No offense, Magento. You suck.)
  4. Compare the column values to those of articles / modules that work just fine, and focus at the start / stop. Do you see any extra / missing symbols?

When I tried this on my article, I stumbled upon the following:

JoomlaMySQLJSON

Pay close attention to what’s going on in the attribs column. Something went wrong, and there’s an extra {“ that shouldn’t be there.

After removing these extra characters, the article opened again.

So, if you are confronted by a JSON error, check your data. And make a back-up first.

Fun Story Time: As it turns out, this wasn’t even the article the client needed to edit and it only said “test”. 

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